Monday, August 1, 2011

The Bums From Brooklyn Are Back In Action (sort of)

You have got to love Turn Back The Clock nights at your local ballpark. It gives younger and newer fans the opportunity to see team jersey's of the past, but more importantly it also brings back memories of championship seasons, and hall of fame players. This year, Major League Baseball has involved several franchises in this favored tradition, which has been appreciated by fans for the past several seasons. Those teams are the Angels, the Rays, the Mariners, the Pirates, the Nationals, the Cardinals, the Phillies, the Padres, the Orioles, the Royals, and of course the Dodgers. If you happen to be a baseball fan, who lives under a rock, the cap you see above is that of the Brooklyn Dodgers. The story of baseball in Brooklyn begins in 1883, when the Brooklyn Atlantics stormed the fields of Park Slope. Throughout the 50 years that followed, the clubs name would change on the average every 9 seasons. Nothing substantial seemed to materialize, until 1932 when a culture was born. In the midst of the Great Depression, the Brooklyn Dodgers were born. In an incredibly difficult economic, and social time period for America, The Bums From Brooklyn became a beacon of hope and unity. The Brooklyn Franchise, which became the Dodgers, played in Ebbets Field from 1913, up until their departure to the West in 1957. Ebbets Field was roughly a 32,000 seat ballpark, located at what used to be 55 Sullivan Place, Brooklyn, New York. While in Brooklyn, the Dodgers Franchise captured 12 National League Pennants, and one World Series Title in 1955. Despite only winning a World Championship once,  the ball club seemingly possesses an aura of sorts. Outside of the games being played on the field, they were truly an innovative franchise in the front office. As all of you know, they were the first Major League Baseball franchise to sign an African American to play on a teams roster. This little player, turned out to be one of the true Dodger greats of all time, Jackie Robinson. Outside of J-Rob, the Brooklyn Dodgers also saw  Pee Wee Reese, Duke Snider, Sandy Koufax, and Roy Campanella put on the blue and white, while playing in New York; all of which have their numbers retired by the franchise today. When the Giants and Dodgers both left New York in 1957, a void was created in the hears of 2/3rd's of New Yokers. Five years later, which probably seemed like an eternity to widowed baseball fans, MLB brought another franchise to New York in the form of the Mets. The Mets, who wear Blue, Orange, White, and Black, get their colors from the two New York franchises of yesteryear; The Brooklyn Dodgers, and the New York Giants. A subtle payment of homage to the classic history and tradition of baseball in the big apple. The cap above, features a Dodger Blue crown and brim, with the Brooklyn Dodgers B (not to be confused with the Red Sox B) front and center. Honestly, I could talk about the rich history and tradition of the Brooklyn Dodgers all day, but that's what Wikipedia  is for. I hope I was able to impart a little big of knowledge, on one of the biggest franchises in New York Sports history. Until tomorrow, enjoy folks!

3 comments:

shelby.norris@gmail.com said...

Probably the most classic of all baseball caps. Ever!

dodgerbobble said...

My favorite hat of all-time!

Matt Aballi said...

Glad you guys enjoyed it! Keep reading!